495 pages, hardcover
$45.00 plus S&H

 

 

Around The Year with Nick Murray: Daily Readings for Financial Advisors

Nick’s newest book is an entirely new format: a program of ten-minute daily readings which can, over the course of one year, turn you into the supremely confident and successful advisor you aspire to be.

You will discover how never to run out of prospects, and that they’re not qualifying you – you’re choosing them. You will accumulate very specific scripts for any and every prospect/client interaction you will ever have. And throughout a year, you’ll discover how finally to insulate your true clients against fear – so that they (and you) can prosper by continuously acting on their plan, not reacting to random circumstances.

Nick: “Every superior belief, behavior, process and script I’ve ever learned are here – to take you to the top of the profession, one day at a time.

Foreword:

As one approaches one’s fiftieth anniversary in the profession of financial advice, one must at least begin to entertain the notion that one’s career may be more than half over.

As I have spent much of my career writing to other advisors, this looming anniversary has prompted me to create a single volume which might serve as a summing up, if not a testament, of that half century.

I’ve said what I needed to say at book length about the essential process of establishing and maintaining a robust client acquisition discipline in The Game of Numbers, and about the practice of managing client emotions (and, incidentally, their portfolios) in Behavioral Investment Counseling. Finally, I’ve directly told investors what their advisors can and can’t do for them—and encouraged them to leave you alone to do it—in Simple Wealth, Inevitable Wealth. I stand on those statements.

Where I found further refinements of those essential statements advisable, they’ve appeared in my newsletter Nick Murray Interactive, the entire archive of which, since the very first issue in January 2001, remains open to subscribers.

But I’ve also derived significant benefit through the years from a couple of spiritual books that are organized as daily readings over a year’s time. So the book you’re about to read is arranged in just this way.

Each day’s essay should, if I’ve done this right, strike you as a complete thought—one which you may wish to consider just for today. But if these thoughts are not systematic, they’re certainly not random. Rather, they are thematic: developing a theory of advice as the year begins, flowing into best principles/practices as winter wanes, beginning a philosophy of the capital markets in spring, and so on through the first half of the year. In the second half, we home in on the application of that philosophy to prospect and client interactions.

In that sense, the cumulative effect of reading each day’s complete thought should, by the end of the year, sum to one Complete Thought.

I would not presume to tell you how to read this book, nor do I think there is any one right way. Some will do as I do with my spiritual readings—take one day’s thought as sufficient to that day, such that one reads the book around the year. Some may consult it randomly for an inspiration. And some may, I suppose, read it straight through once, before returning to it daily. The way that works best for you—that yields you the most practical value—will surely be the right way.

But whichever way (or ways) you choose to read it, I hope you will find me there with you as you do, serving as a friend and a counselor to those who would live in a spirit of empathetic guidance. For the plain truth that animates all these observations is that our countrymen are lost, financially, without a consistent plan and an excellent planner.

I trained at E. F. Hutton & Company in the summer of 1967. One evening, I looked up to find that everyone was gone except my manager and me. I walked over to his desk, and asked him if there were a book I could read that would tell me how to do this wonderful career right. He said there was no book, and for a moment I was sure I must have misheard him.

I’m not looking for a whole law library, I stammered: just one book. He repeated that there was no book.

I went back and sat down at my desk in a kind of daze. And then I thought, “Someday, if I make it, I’m going to write that book.”

This is that book I promised myself—and you—half a century of summers ago.

          -- Nick Murray


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